Sessions

All session titles are tentative and may change. All classes start at 4:25PM Eastern, most will end by 6PM Eastern.

Final class grades are computed from the lab grades – there is no final exam this year. All dates are for 2017, all times are Eastern (EST or EDT as appropriate). You can use the “Categories” to filter sessions.

Aug
24
Thu
Session 0: Course Introduction
Aug 24 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

We will introduce the teaching environment (technical and organizationally), and present the class itself.

Lecture notes

  • INFO7470 2017 Course Introduction  (PPTXPDF)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Aug
31
Thu
Session 1: Overview of the U.S. Statistical System
Aug 31 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

An overview of the U.S. statistical system is given.

 

Lecture notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Sep
7
Thu
Session 2: History of the Federal Statistical Infrastructure
Sep 7 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

Margo Anderson (University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee) presents on the history of the federal statistical system (flipped classroom). She will be present to discuss the lecture.

Readings and other information

Lecture Notes

Historical Perspectives on the U.S. Federal Statistical System

About the Guest Lecturer

Margo Anderson, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

Margo Anderson

Margo Anderson is Distinguished Professor of History & Urban Studies at the University of Wisconson – Milwaukee. She specializes in American social, urban and women’s history and has research interests in both urban history and the history of the social sciences and the development of statistical data systems, particularly the census. Her publications include Who Counts? The Politics of Census Taking in Contemporary America (2001), coauthored with Stephen E. Fienberg, and a coedited volume with Victor Greene, Perspectives on Milwaukee’s Past (University of Illinois Press, 2009). Her most recent publication, of particular relevance to this class, is The American Census: A Social History, Second Edition. Yale University Press, 2015. More information about Margo can be found at her University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee website and her personal website.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Sep
14
Thu
Session 3: [No class] Universes, Populations, Frames, and Sampling
Sep 14 @ 4:25 pm – 4:30 pm

This class coincides with FSRDC system’s annual conference. There will be no in-classroom activity at most sites on this day (please check with local coordinator). The content of this section will be discussed on Sept 21, 2017, so students should take the time to view the materials on edX during this week.

Lecture notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Sep
21
Thu
Session 4: Measuring People and Households
Sep 21 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

This lecture is a “flipped” lecture.

Discussion lead

Warren Brown, Cornell University

Warren Brown

Warren A. Brown is Senior Research Associate at Cornell University where he directs the Program on Applied Demographics and is the Research Director of the Cornell site of the New York Federal Statistical Research Data Center, a consortium of research institutions in the New York metropolitan area and upstate New York. He is also the 2015-2016 President of the Association of Public Data Users (APDU) and serving on the National Academy of Science’s Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations. His teaching, research and outreach efforts involve him with the application of demographic information to areas such as strategic planning for workforce and economic development, consumer behavior and market analysis, households and housing market analysis, regional transportation planning, hospitality and recreation industries, health services for the elderly, and environmental protection. He is an expert on the American Community Survey.

Lecture Notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Sep
28
Thu
Session 5: Measuring Business and Economic Activity
Sep 28 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

This lecture is a “flipped” lecture. 

Lecture Notes

Lab

The lab will be posted on edX.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Oct
12
Thu
Session 7: Data from Other Statistical Agencies and Other Sources
Oct 12 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm


Health statistics, energy statistics, agricultural statistics, others. Registered-based statistics, organic data.

Discussion leads

Erica Groshen, Cornell University, will take part in the discussion.
Erica Groshen

Erica L. Groshen is currently a visiting scholar at the ILR School of Cornell University. She is the former Commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which is the principal federal statistical agency responsible for measuring U.S.labor market activity, working conditions and inflation. Her term ended on January 27, 2017. Previously, Groshen served as a vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Dr. Groshen’s research focuses on jobless recoveries, regional labor markets, wage rigidity and dispersion, the male-female wage differential, service-sector employment, and the role of employers in labor market outcomes.
She has served as a member of the BLS Data Users’ Advisory Committee and the Census Bureau’s 2010 Census Advisory Committee and also as an American Economic Association representative to the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. On behalf of the New York Fed, she initiated the effort to form the consortium of thirteen research institutions that created the New York Census Research Data Center at Baruch College in 2006. Groshen received a bachelor’s degree in economics and mathematics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Brent Hueth, University of Wisconsin-Madison, will be discussing topics related to agricultural statistics.
Brent Hueth

Brent Hueth is Director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Cooperatives, with an appointment as associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. Brent has published in top economics journal including the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, the Journal of Regulatory Economics, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, and the Journal of Economics and Management Strategy. Brent is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Exceptional Growth Companies, and Executive Director of the Census Bureau’s Research Data Center at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. Brent’s research and teaching focus on agricultural markets, cooperative enterprise, and economic development. (More info)

Lecture Notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Oct
19
Thu
Session 8: Census Geography
Oct 19 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

This will be “flipped classroom” on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – basic geocoding, geographic concepts, and other topics.

Discussion lead

Michael Ratcliffe, U.S. Census Bureau

Assistant Division Chief for Geocartographic Products and Criteria, Geography Division, U.S. Census Bureau.

Lecture Notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Oct
26
Thu
Session 9: Restricted Access Data
Oct 26 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

Flipped classrom about access to restricted access data. Students will be introduced to the research proposal mechanism of the Federal Statistical Research Data Center, including data from the Census Bureau, NCHS, and BLS.

Discussion will focus on how to access various restricted access data sets. Guest presenters may be present live in the videoconference classroom.

The presentation on replicable science is moved to next week a later date.

Lecture Notes

Additional links

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Nov
2
Thu
Session 10: Replication and Statistical Tools – Record Linkage
Nov 2 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

The class is both flipped classroom and live presentation.

Presentation

We discuss the need for and the requirements of replicable science (in general, and in restricted-access environments). This part is a live lecture by Lars Vilhuber.

Introduction to record linking

  • What is record linking, what is it not, what is the theory?
  • Record linking: applications and examples – How do you do it, what do you need, what are the possible complications?
  • Examples of record linking

Lecture Notes

Discussion lead

John M. Abowd, U.S. Census Bureau and Cornell University, will lead the discussion.
John Abowd

John M. Abowd is currently the Associate Director for Research and Methodology and Chief Scientist, United States Census Bureau, on leave from Cornell University. At Cornell, he is the Edmund Ezra Day Professor of Economics, Professor of Statistics and Information Science at Cornell University, and the Director of the Labor Dynamics Institute (LDI) at Cornell. He previously served as a Distinguished Senior Research Fellow at the United States Census Bureau (1998-2015). He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER, Cambridge, MA), Research Affiliate at the Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique (CREST, Paris, France), Research Fellow at the Institute for Labor Economics (IZA, Bonn, Germany), and Research Fellow at IAB (Institut für Arbeitsmarkt-und Berufsforschung, Nürnberg, Germany). He is the outgoing President (2014-2015) and Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, a past Chair (2013) of the Business and Economic Statistics Section and a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. He is an Elected Member of the International Statistical Institute and a Fellow of the Econometric Society. He previously served on the National Academies’ Committee on National Statistics (2010- 2016) and on the American Economic Association’s Committee on Economic Statistics. He served as Director of the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER) from 1999 to 2007.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Nov
9
Thu
Session 11: Statistical Tools – Edit and Imputation
Nov 9 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm
  • Formal models of edits and imputations
  • Missing data overview
  • Missing records – Frame or census – Survey
  • Missing items
  • Overview of different products
  • Overview of methods
  • Formal multiple imputation methods

Lecture Notes

Extra lecture

Lab

The lab (an edit and imputation exercise) is posted on the INFO7470x edX site. You will need to create a program, and upload the program (language of your choice) to edX. A toy example is illustrated in a video on the edX site, you can download the spreadsheet toy-example-imputation.xlsx here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Nov
16
Thu
Session 12: Statistical Tools – Disclosure Limitation Methods – Synthetic Data
Nov 16 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm
  • Why must users of restricted-access data learn about confidentiality protection?
  • What is statistical disclosure limitation?
  • What are privacy-preserving data mining and differential privacy?
  • Basic methods for disclosure avoidance (SDL)
  • Rules and methods for model-based SDL
  • SDL-based noise methods
  • Synthetic data
  • Differential privacy methods

Lecture Notes

Supplementary Materials

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Nov
23
Thu
No class (Cornell Thanksgiving Recess)
Nov 23 all-day
Nov
30
Thu
Session 13: Statistical Tools – Geographic and Network Analysis Methods
Nov 30 @ 4:25 pm – 6:00 pm

Flipped class

  • Part A: Spatial Analysis (Nicholas Nagle of University of Tennessee – Knoxville)
  • Part B: Network Analysis (John Abowd, Cornell University)


Part A: Spatial Analysis

Topics

  • Basic Geocoding
  • Tools for Geocoding
  • Analysis Methods
  • Tools for Geographic Analysis

Lecture Notes

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Dec
7
Thu
No final exam
Dec 7 all-day

The class does not have a final exam. The last class at Cornell is on November 30. Check with your local coordinator about any local arrangements.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Previous versions of the course can be found in our archives.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email